International Speech Contest Tips

What Will Be Your Magic Moment

TOASTMASTERS INTERNATIONAL SPEECH CONTEST PREPARATION & DELIVERY

Topic Selection – Questions Before Beginning The Process

  • Are you passionate about the subject?
  • Is this an appropriate subject for this particular audience?
  • What will be your  Magic Moment?
  • Who is the HERO of my story?
  • What is the Purpose/Point of the speech?

Types of Speeches:

  • Informative: A clear and concise delivery of information of facts.
  • Entertaining: Focusing on keeping your audience happy and entertained.
  • Persuasive or Motivational: To encourage your audience to take action.

 The Two Stages – The Four P’s 

  1. Preparation: The process of documenting and researching your topic.
  2. Presentation: Practicing and delivering your speech.

 The Parts of Your Speech

  • Speech Title: Short – Don’t let your title  give away the speech
  • First Expressions: Effective Openings. (Humor –Thought Provoking)
  • Salutations – Place Your Salutations in the first minute (Mr. TM etc – Optional).
  • Your check-In Establish a connection with your audience.
  • Your High Five – Five lines which tell where your story is heading.
  • Conclusion Indication that you are about to close. ( My Fellow Toastmasters)
  • Your Take Away – Your Call to Action.

Decide what you want listeners to Think – Feel or Do.

  • Your attention getter * Your first sentence* Be provocative*
  • Identify with your topic early. Let your audience know where you are heading.
  • Get your audience to agree with your point of view. (Read your audience)
  • Structure your main points so that your audience can recall them.

The four points of attack: Your 4 H factors:

Head > Heart > Humor > Heavy Lifting – Heavy Lifting – Taking your audience on the journey after you have engaged them with head, heart, and humor.

How to time your speech:

Calculate your rate of speaking. Men average 125 wpm while women average 150 wpm.  Some speeches may have averaged 600 -750 while other averaged 800 – 1100

  • Five to seven-minute speeches should average 750 to 800 words – for comfort.
  • Use single syllable words
  • A picture is worth ……..
  • With pictures or a prop, you could increase that number significantly.
  • Place important words at the beginning or the end of your sentences.

    Delivery

  • Use familiar words: Use everyday speaking language.
  • Use short sentences: They can be very effective after a long sentence.
  • Personalize stories: Speak from the heart.
  • Turn the ordinary to extraordinary: Remove unnecessary words.
  • Use vivid Language: Use descriptive words. Paint word pictures.

Silence is just as important as the spoken word. 

  • Pause before and after important ideas.
  • If you speak continuously you will lose your audience.
  • Strategically placed pauses can say more than words.
  • The silence after the pause sends the message.

 Make a point – Tell a Story – Make a Point  –  The Six words that can change the way you speak and deliver your message. The six emotions we all respond to – Happiness, Sadness, Surprise, Anger, Fear, Disgust

Don’t give your speech— Deliver it – Use Martin Joo’s Speech Registers

  • Frozen Formal Consultative Casual Intimate – Registers to deliver your message
  • Use the platform carefully to lay out your speech.  Watch Your Placements.
  • Develop a speech storyboard.
  • Watch your Vocal Variety and Body language – Your Body Speaks.
  • Video Tape and self-evaluate your speech. (Sound on /Sound off)

Don’t Memorize – Internalize Your Speech:

  • Practice but don’t memorize the speech. Live it on stage -Be in the moment
  • Improve your physical fitness…Your breathing is very important to your delivery
  • Speak frequently at other clubs. Stage time… Stage time
  • Become familiar with the venue: The lights the sound the stage. Try to get a view of the audience from the speaking area before you are introduced to speak.
  • Expect the unexpected. Take advantage of it where possible.

 

Author: HenryOMiller

Henry joined Toastmaster in March of 1997. He is presently a member of five clubs in the Santa Cruz and San Jose area. Henry is an executive speech coach, humorist, and speechwriter. He is also a musician and a lyricist​ who likes to approaches his speechwriting similar to his approach to songwriting.