Your Quotable Quotes

We should speak to be repeated

20180617_171815One of the many statements I heard early in my speaking career that inspired me even to this day is, we should speak to be heard, we should speak to be understood, we should speak to be repeated, not only by ourselves but also by others.

Since the beginning of time, words of wisdom have been said by famous speakers and even mere mortals like yourself.  Many timeless words of wisdom can also be found in the Bible, and also in the wisdom of our parent’s frustrations in their moments of tireless parenting. While it OK to borrow from their wisdom and Quotes which encouraged, inspired and entertained us all, we should also create and constantly update a file of our own with your own words of wisdom. Who knows, one day they too may become as famous as those we all know and love.

When delivering quotes, it is a good idea to refer to Martin Joo’s 5 styles of communicating: Frozen, Formal, Consultative, Casual, & Intimate which were covered in my previous postings. Many quotes are best delivered and received by audiences in the Frozen and Formal registers:

  1. Frozen:     Formal and elegant style of speaking. Ask not what your country etc.
  2. Formal:     Used to address audiences…  I have a dream etc….

Your delivery will determine your degree of success, however, your quotes must be strategically placed in your speech. How and when your Quote is delivered, is very important. Keep your Quotes short. The shorter the better. Here are a few I love.

Don’t find fault. Find a remedy!  Henry Ford. (You too have said that many times.)

Anger is just one letter short of danger.   Proverbs 14:29

The Lord protects the innocent and the foolish and those of us who are twice blessed, (Big George – My Dad – RIP).

 

     

Author: HenryOMiller

Henry joined Toastmaster in March of 1997. He is presently a member of five clubs in the Santa Cruz and San Jose area. Henry is an executive speech coach, humorist, and speechwriter. He is also a musician and a lyricist​ who likes to approaches his speechwriting similar to his approach to songwriting.