Making Your Case

To make your case, you must first have one.

pexels-photo-290150.jpegThe art of persuading audiences and judges is as old as life itself. However, success or failure depends largely on how well you succeed in making your case. At Toastmasters meetings speeches are evaluated; we “evaluate to motivate.” But too often we highlight the good and whitewash that which needs improvement. In speech contests, presentations are judged to pick a winner. The objectives are very different; however, one may conclude that it does not matter if you are being evaluated or judged when your purpose is making your case.

To make your case, you must first have one. You must be clear about what you are asking your audience to think, feel or do. You must also be sure that what you are asking your audience to do is doable. If after you have presented your reasoning to that audience or judges, they should be so impressed by your argument about that which you are asking them to do, or not do, is the best in this case and in similar situations to follow, you would have made your case. This process is a proven method of presenting, judges and lawyers use courts, CEOs, and executives use successfully.

Making a connection with your audience is just as important as knowing everything about the subject matter you are presenting. Your ability to communicate is a gift to all. Although we may communicate differently, we all were born with the proverbial “gift of gab” in some form. As kids, we were able to talk ourselves out of any sticky situation. Don’t remember, ask your parents, they will be happy to remind you. Then it happened. Once we became conscious that there is a difference between talking in private and speaking in public, we became fearful of being embarrassed. We lost that gift of making your case, well except for those times when we get outraged. Why! Many will argue it is all because of fear.

Of all the emotions we are faced with on the platform, perhaps fear is one of the easiest to control. How do we control fear? Fear is controlled by you being true to yourself; just like when you were outraged. By being who you are, and what you are all about when you are on the platform. Sincerity is essential when speaking in public. If you are not sincere, you will always be looking over your shoulders. Your voice will quiver, knees will weaken, and as many who have been there and done that would confess, you would rather die than do what comes naturally – speak in public.

I have heard it said the most crucial minute in your speech is or should be the minute of silence after you have finished speaking. If at the end of your presentation, your evaluator, audience or judges feel compelled to take some action, positive or negative, you most likely would have or would have not made your case. Be clear about the purpose and the goals you want to achieve. A speech without a clear purpose will accomplish nothing. Decide before you step on that platform if your goal is to persuade, inform or entertain. Keep that goal like a banner in the front of your mind from the beginning of your talk to end. And when it is all over, the applause will let you know if or how well you have made your case.