Speaking From Squares

Great speeches are not read; they are delivered.

 

IMG_6299Speaking from Squares can be fun. I often use squares to turn topics into speeches using squares. I begin with a blank sheet of paper. Fold it lengthways first, then once over to end up with four squares. If the plan is to deliver a longer speech, fold the square sheet one more time to end up with eight rectangles; however, for the purpose of this exercise, let’s call them square.

Now, unfold the entire sheet of paper. For a short address, you now have four squares. For longer speeches, you have eight squares to work with. You also have a crease like a spine running down the center of the page. On that crease, write your foundational statement to keep you grounded. At the top of each of the squares, add the speech title. Later you will add a subtitle to each title of the speech in each square. You are now ready to begin filling in your squares.

Add the subtitle, “introduction,” to square one. For your introduction, you may choose to include a salutation to recognize your presenter and audience or, you may prefer to go straight into the presentation. I like adding a greeting. It adds a professional touch to your opening. Always remember you are at that lectern or podium because of the audience. Without an audience, you might as well deliver your speech to the trees in the forest. Set the stage for your presentation in that first square. Make your initial contact with your audience count. State your message clearly. Your message should also resonate with your foundational statement, speech title, and subtitle. Your purpose for facing that audience should be clear visually and verbally.

Next, go to square four. Add a label to that square with the subtitle, “summary.” Recall two or three of the talking points you made in square one. Later you will also add any power statements you delivered from your stories in squares two and three. Always remember, your message is the purpose of you giving that speech. Every talking point you include in your squares should point back to your foundational statement, title, and subtitle. Your labeling will pay huge dividends when you are ready to deliver your presentation. You will find it is much easier to focus on the title, subtitle, and foundational statement as they relate to the square you are delivering, before moving on to the next and the next.

In squares two and three, add your subtitles just as you did for squares one and four. Again, your talking points should relate to your title, subtitle, and foundational statement. Try keeping your subtitles to one word wherever possible. In squares two and three, you will make a point to tell a story or tell a story to make your point. When you are presenting a speech that is under ten minutes, four squares work well. Once you have mastered the four squares model, it is quite easy to move on to eight squares and above for longer presentations or even a TED talk.

When you are using an eight square model, you can use one or even two squares for introduction, two for the summary, and four or six subtitle squares for the body of your presentation.  You can make your model however you like. Once you have finalized your model, you are now ready to have fun connecting your talking points to your title, subtitles, and foundational statement. Draw lines to connect the subtitles to the foundational statement. I call it connecting the dots. Soon you will notice you have a storyboard, mindmap, or worksheet for your speech.  You are now ready to write.

The sole purpose of this exercise is to prepare your speech for delivery. I am often reminded of these words from one of my mentors,” great speeches are not read; they are delivered.” Write for the ear and not for the eyes. The writing and editing of your speech using your storyboard, mindmap, or worksheet should keep you focused on your message. With your first draft, you can now begin practicing, editing, and re-editing as you continue testing. Soon you too will be having fun delivering that topic, that speech and many of your speeches in the future, speaking from squares.

Author: HenryOMiller

Henry joined Toastmaster in March of 1997. He is presently a member of five clubs in the Santa Cruz and San Jose area. Henry is an executive speech coach, humorist, and speechwriter. He is also a musician and a lyricist​ who likes to approaches his speechwriting similar to his approach to songwriting.