Your three Ps of Public Speaking

Your purpose and point should go hand in hand

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The Bernal Hill

What are your three Ps of Public Speaking?  For some of us, it is Preparation, Practice & Presentation for others – Pitch, Pace & Pauses. Then there it is Practice. Practice. Practice. While all your Ps are import parts of the process of bringing a speech to the platform, when you focus on your Preparation, all your other P’s fall into place.

A question we all should ask ourselves as we begin our preparation is what my purpose for speaking is – Is it to inform, persuade, inspire, or entertain? If you do not have a purpose, then what is the point of speaking?  Once you are clear about your purpose, the points will often follow. Your audience will be more inclined to accept you and the points you make when they are interested in your purpose.  Your purpose and point should go hand in hand. Next, you should decide on the strategies you would use to make your purpose resonate with that audience. You can use humor, statistics, or an opening that is thought-provoking to arouse curiosity about what will follow.

Presenters should make sure they are appropriately dressed for the type of information they plan to present. First impressions count. When you step unto the platform, before you utter your first words, your attire will determine the chatter in the minds of your audience. Your credibility is on the line when it comes to how you look. Your clothes speak as loudly as what you do or say when you are on the platform. If your audience respects you, they are more likely to consider your ideas and suggestions. How you present yourself will significantly influence the results when your objective is to inform, persuade, inspire, or just attempting to be funny.

How you practice can make all the difference. Formal or casual Practice can take place anytime, anywhere. There are times you will need an audience and times when you will not. You can practice the flow of your speech, rhythm, or timing, even when you are driving. Today, we have the option also to practice online. That gives us the added dimension of seeing ourselves as we practice, which can help us correct the bad habits we develop. We should always remember what your Practice becomes permanent. Review your presentation as if you are a member of your audience. Evaluate what you saw heard and felt based on the purpose of your presentation. If you get your point, you have found your three Ps of public speaking

Author: HenryOMiller

Henry joined Toastmaster in March of 1997. He is presently a member of five clubs in the Santa Cruz and San Jose area. Henry is an executive speech coach, humorist, and speechwriter. He is also a musician and a lyricist​ who likes to approaches his speechwriting similar to his approach to songwriting.