Better Living Through Chemistry

A patient cured is a customer lost.

Pain management has become a major part of my daily living. In my youth, I too fell for that old saying, no pain, no gain. However, today, I have taken comfort in the fact that where there is pain, there is life. Recently I have taken an interest in natural remedies for my pain management. So, when I heard the following speech delivered by Deanne Deaville at her Morgan Hill Toastmasters Club, which I often attend, I asked, can I post your speech to my Blog? She obliged, and here it is – Better Living Through Chemistry – Deanne Deaville:

For hundreds of years, traditional herbalists worldwide knew that if someone was in pain, whether it be from a muscle sprain, a broken bone, or maybe something internally, they could go to a willow tree, pull off some bark, and make a compress and apply it directly. Or, make a tea to drink.

And if somebody had a lung issue, they could find a cherry tree and pull the bark to make a syrup with other herbs and local honey. Or perhaps someone inadvertently walked through poison ivy or poison oak; a traditional herbalist would know to go back to the same location and find jewelweed, which always grows nearby and is the natural antidote.

But today’s motto is better living through chemistry. It has a nice ring to it, doesn’t it? It sounds like science. Which means it’s efficient, effective, proven. It also gives us the impression that we can do whatever we want, and if something goes wrong, just take a pill for that.

For thousands of years, energy workers, primarily in the far East, knew how to adjust energy. Subtle pressure, using hands, massage, spinal manipulation, needles, also known as acupuncture, would affect the flow of energy through our body through meridian systems that they mapped out thousands of years ago.

Sometimes too much energy is flowing; other times, too little, it’s stagnant or blocked. Qigong, and energy movement, sometimes called meditation in motion, is practiced daily by millions. And many Qigong masters say, if you practice this ancient art of effortless motion for 20 minutes a day, you will live disease-free to 120 years old. That’s a pretty good promise.

But today’s motto is about science. Better living through chemistry. New is better. The new discoveries and what we’ve learned in higher education are better. And they’ve made pills for whatever we might need. For hundreds of years, herbalists traditionally knew how to gather and use herbs, known as wildcrafting, and for thousands of years, energy workers have manipulated the flow of energy.

Today more and more people are interested in these old ways. Why? Because they work. And they work without side effects.  You can go to your doctor and walk away with a pill to help with whatever is ailing you at that moment, but they’re generally many side effects, and then more pills come as a result. Which can then lead to more side effects, more problems. But there’s a pill for that too. It never ends.

There’s always going to be a need for more. Another issue, another symptom. Another pill, another booster. But by now, our culture has been raised in this “better living through chemistry” motto. And you might think that it unfolded naturally and organically became this way through modern ways of life and capitalism. Supply and demand sort of thing. And while there is some truth to that, as that is a machine we have in place in this country, it didn’t begin this way.

In truth, it began over 100 years ago with a guy named Abraham Flexner. He started questioning the validity of universities, specifically in medicine. Instead, he felt they should be more rigorous and more science-based. This caught the attention of the Carnegie Foundation, who then commissioned him to write what is now known as the Flexner report. This report, published in 1910 with the purpose of promoting science in academia.

To promote science-based, evidence-based, chemistry-based treatments for health issues. For example, teaching the mechanistic method of individual parts and treating these with chemistry – drugs – marketed as medicines. And this is the method that was then taught in universities. But, it was new and better, and the future.

This report came out just a few years after the Food and Drug Act was passed in 1906 (later becoming what we now know as the FDA) and a few years after the USPTO was formed. Their rules stated a natural substance on its own, found in plants, could not be patented; however, if the active component of the plant could be isolated, this could be viable for a patent.

Hence, willow-bark would not be allowed to be owned and protected, but aspirin – salicylic acid, the active component – could be, and the Bayer company owned that product. The Flexner report was then heavily promoted and lauded as a better way. Big money went into the funding of these schools like the Harvard school of medicine, Johns Hopkins University. The report also attacked the natural medicine schools.

While promoting the new and better, it also simultaneously discredited other types of health schools, including chiropractic, naturopathic, and homeopathy. It became obvious that if one aspired to be a reputable doctor, one would attend a professional and formal school and not be associated with the other side, which was starting to be known then as quacks. As these other schools got bigger, the natural side of schools and education got smaller. And 100 years later, here we are.

This is about money. Big money. A patient cured is a customer lost.

It is estimated that more than 400,000 people die annually of properly prescribed medications. That’s properly prescribed! As opposed to herbs and natural forms of treatment which virtually do no harm. There was one time, about 15 years ago, I believe a baseball player took a whole bottle of “ma huang,” also known as ephedra.

And, he apparently didn’t drink any water. And he died. So, the FDA banned the herb. They outlawed it. They said it was dangerous. A few others had died previously, although not conclusively as a result of taking this herb, and one known, after taking it incorrectly. As opposed to more than 400,000 dying every year.

Decade after decade from properly prescribed medications. Add to this person who do not take prescription medicines correctly. Maybe they didn’t remember if they took their meds this morning, so they take another or even over-the-counter drugs which are abused regularly, such as Tylenol. And the opiate crises, highly addictive poisons… Then add to these medical mistakes; this is by far the greatest cause of death every year in this country, by many times over. 

The slogan better living through chemistry came from a marketing campaign by Dupont chemical company in 1935. Their ad stated, “better things for better living through chemistry.” Marguerite Adelman said about this ad, “the slogan had little to do with chemistry and more to do with promoting big business as a force for moral good and continual progress.” Moral good… continual progress…..All things that sound desirable and worthy of moving toward as a society.

But will big business really be a force for moral good and continual progress? I believe the way forward is to go back. To go back to traditional methods. And we each have the power and the choice to do so – at least today we do. Preservation of health is easier than the cure for disease.  And in the process, you will feel better. You will have more energy. You’ll enjoy life more. Better living is not through chemistry but by living in accord within the laws of nature.

Deanne Deaville: After an unexpected cancer diagnosis, Deanne turned her non-stop life of chaos to one of thriving and high energy through targeted nutrition and authentic living techniques, which she now teaches to others. She is a best-selling author, healthy lifestyle coach, and workshop facilitator with a formal background in nutrition who helps stressed and overwhelmed professionals gain increased clarity, productivity, energy, and more fulfillment from life. In short, a coach to help you shift your life to one worth living.  You can reach Deanne by email at Coach@HealthyByHeart.com.

Author: HenryOMiller

Henry joined Toastmaster in March of 1997. He is presently a member of five clubs in the Santa Cruz and San Jose area. Henry is an executive speech coach, humorist, and speechwriter. He is also a musician and a lyricist​ who likes to approaches his speechwriting similar to his approach to songwriting.