Adding Dialogue to Your Monologue

With dialogue, you can bring an experience or event back to life.

We all have heard it said. No one could tell your story better than you. While that may be true, how you tell your story can make all the difference. Speakers often deliver their presentations as a monologue, dialogue, or with a combination of both. Stories delivered as a monologue is one person doing all the talking.  With dialogue, the speaker can punctuate their presentation with the characters’ voices to make their point more effective or move an audience to make the story unforgettable.

The word monologue has its roots in the Greek word “monologos” – translation, speaking alone.  Dialogue also has Greek roots derived from the word “dialogos” – a conversation between two or more characters narrating parts of the story. Many speakers deliver their entire presentation as a monologue.  However, when you add dialogue to a monologue, speakers can engage their audience as if they both are having a conversation within the presentation.

Dialogue takes you back to experience the scene’s true emotional and personal impact. When two or more people are involved in a conversation, everyone brings their pleasures and pains to the platform. Their emotions are express as a conversation with the audience. The speaker is no longer telling the story or delivering the message to the audience. Instead, the speaker is reliving a moment in time with the audience. With dialogue, you can bring an experience or event back to life.  You can take your audience back to the time and place of the event to show your audience what happened and not just tell them about what happened.

Dialogue also opens the doors to a wide range of voices and opportunities to explore your vocal variety. It is always more interesting for an audience to hear other voices in a speech and not just one voice narrating a story. For example, you cannot deliver what was said using the character’s voice when delivering a monologue. With dialogue, you can create other voices to make your presentation conversational, more interesting, and memorable for your audience.

The beauty of dialogue, when used correctly, does not dominate the speech; it blends in seamlessly. Administer your dialogue in small doses like medicine. A little goes a long way in making parts of your presentation unforgettable.  Dr. Randy Harvey demonstrated that technique beautifully in his speech – Lessons from Fatdad.  Here is that amazing emotional scene he created after his dad’s thunderous bellow scattered their hounds like cottonseeds on the wind:

“The next morning – Fatdad was buffing the scratches out of his new car.

 I said – “Fatdad, I’m sorry you had to rescue me.”

He scooped me up in his big arms,

Said – “Son, in life, sometimes you’re the catcher – sometimes you’re the caught.”

“When you love somebody – their trouble is your trouble.”

That line delivered with dialogue remains one of the most unforgettable moments of that speech to this day. His speech also won him the coveted title of World Champion of Public Speaking in August of 2004.

When using quotations, dialogue allows the speaker to imitate the voice of the person you are quoting.  With dialogue, a speaker can use voice, tone, and inflections to bring the words of great speakers back to life. Just a snippet is often enough to change the focus of your audience in a speech. At that moment, audiences often reflect on a time and place when those exact words meant something special to them. For some, it can be a moment of learning, growth, understanding, or renewal.

We all have stories to tell, so don’t be afraid to tell yours.   Practice using stories within your speeches. Use dialogue to transport your audiences back in time. Share the emotions you once experienced with your audiences. Explore different storytelling styles by adding dialogue to your monologue.  Be conscious of which part of the body you are addressing as you speak. Ask yourself, am I addressing the head, heart, hands, or feet? Get your audiences to think, feel or do something. Speak with a purpose, and someone will always be ready, willing, and able to lend you an attentive ear.  When you speak from the heart, the world will listen. And you, your voice, and your stories will live on forever.

Author: HenryOMiller

Henry joined Toastmaster in March of 1997. He is presently a member of five clubs in the Santa Cruz and San Jose area. Henry is an executive speech coach, humorist, and speechwriter. He is also a musician and a lyricist​ who likes to approaches his speechwriting similar to his approach to songwriting.